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Meditate in Caves in Thiruvannamalai, India

View of the City Thiruvannamalai from Arunachala

View of the City Thiruvannamalai from Arunachala


Hello

I read your article about meditating in caves.
I am interested to know more about this topic. What is it actually like? Is it even possible for a westerner nowadays, to go to the Himalayas and meditate? Is it possible to be totally isolated?

I look forward to your reply.

Yours,
Reader Name Redacted

Dear Reader,

First of all, thanks for reading my blog! I’m happy that my adventures in India have piqued your curiosity.

As I’ve never been to the Himalayas, I can’t comment on any caves there.

It is, however, totally possible for anyone to go where I was in southern India and meditate! In southern India there is a holy mountain called Arunachala in the town of Thiruvannamalai in Tamil Nadu.

Arunachala

Arunachala

Arunachala has many fantastic stories told about its origins, and every November or December there’s a huge festival called Karthikai Deepam here where devotees light a pillar of fire 10 feet tall that burns for 10 days. I stayed overnight on the top of the mountain while that pillar burned, and I recommend the experience if you’re a seeker. And I guess you are seeking, otherwise, you wouldn’t be asking me about meditating in caves, right? šŸ˜‰

The city Thiruvannamalai has more sacred sites than just the mountain Arunachala: the fire temple of Shiva, Annamalaiyar Temple, is located in the city’s “downtown” and a bit further away is the Ramana Ashram, which abuts Arunachala. Those two are the main sites, but there are more than 100 shrines and temples around the base of Arunachala. Because of all the sacred sites and what people say the sacred energy of the area, there are many babas, holy men, sadhus, and seekers in Thiruvannamalai, which means you can totally find a place to stay among other pilgrims.

A nice Sadhu I met who showed me where to get drinking water from the rocks

A nice Sadhu I met who showed me where to get drinking water from the rocks

Since almost all the sites to see in this town are sacred, that means the other travelers here are pilgrims.Ā I don’t know if you will ever be truly isolated, but because other people are also here to visit sacred sites, they will respect that you’re meditating. In fact, while I was meditating in Virupaksha Cave, a group of men came in to pay their respects, and it didn’t bother me at all. Then again, I was also very deep in meditation, so your experience may be different.

Because Arunachala is volcanic in origin, there are many caves around the mountain. The two caves in which I meditated are maintained by Ramana Ashram: Skanda Cave and Virupaksha Cave. These caves have walls / buildings built around them, which I think is good so that animals don’t come inside. The photo below shows the entrance to Virukpaksha Cave:

Entrance To Virukpaksha CaveEntrance To Virukpaksha Cave

I hope I’ve given you enough details to convince you to go šŸ™‚

Let me know in the comments if you have any other questions or maybe a photo of you at Arunachala?

Signature from Bettina of Active Hands Yoga

 

 

 

 

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