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Articles tagged “mp3”

Yogis Talk : David Wells about Thai Yoga (Reusi Dat Ton)

Thai Yoga aka Reusi Dat Ton Painting

Funny how you start stumbling down paths when you start studying yoga.

I stumbled upon David Wells’ information about Thai yoga aka Reusi Dat Ton and was curious about this other branch of yoga I had never heard about. Since one of my earliest Yogis Talk interviews with a yogi who had meditated in Thailand, I was curious to learn more about movement and meditation traditions there.

To find out:

  • how Thai yoga is different from Indian hatha yoga
  • what to do, according to Thai yoga, if you get a leg cramp (Edited on August 8, 2012 : oops! that should have been foot cramp) or have shoulder problems
  • how to mix different yoga styles to your benefit
  • how David persuaded a living reusi (rishi) to teach him traditional Thai Yoga

Listen to my interview with David below or save it to your mp3 player by right-clicking here.

David Wells of Wells Yoga

Want to learn more about Thai yoga?

Get in touch with David through his website Wells Yoga or take one of his yoga classes in California.


All photos from David Wells

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Yogis Talk Radio Show : Monica Bloom of Hey Monica Bloom

 

Vata Pitta Kapha Ayurvedic Lotuses

 

Have you ever heard of Ayurveda? It’s a sister science to yoga whose name literally means “knowledge of life.”

Ayurveda is now used mainly as a holistic healing method, whose overarching goal is staying in balance with the nature around us and with our inner nature.

According to Ayurveda, nature and we are all made up of different combinations of five elements–earth, water, fire, air, and ether. Our internal combinations of the elements determine what energy rules our body and mind. These energies are called doshas, of which there are three : vata, pitta, and kapha.

Ayurveda Is all about You

Since these doshas affect our personality and our health, knowing your dosha would help you know what food, exercise, working environment, schedule and so on would give you the best physical, mental, and emotional health.

For example, if your dominant dosha is fiery and sharp pitta, then you need to calm and cool down to balance it out.

On the other hand, if your dominant dosha is energetic and scattered vata, then you need structure and grounding to remain balanced.

If you’re slow and steady like an elephant, as a kapha you need get moving and eat light foods.

 

Monica Bloom of Hey Monica B

 

To learn more about Ayurveda, listen to my interview below (or download it) with Ayurvedic consultant Monica Bloom of Hey Monica B to find out:

  • what doshas are, Ayurvedically speaking
  • how to figure out your or other people’s dosha through what you/they look like
  • how to identify other people’s dosha through their emails in less than five minutes
  • the best way to communicate as a yoga teacher with each dosha type to address their learning styles

 

Want to learn more about Ayurveda? Here are your ACTION STEPS:

  1. Find out what your dosha type is by taking Monica’s dosha test.
  2. As Monica mentioned, summer is pitta season. Find out more about how to stay cool in the summer in her free magazine Seasonal Bloom for Pitta. This also applies to pitta people.
  3. If you’re a kapha, check out her Seasonal Bloom for Kapha.
  4. If you’re a vata or know a vata, download the comprehensive guide to vatas.
  5. Learn more about ayurveda through Monica’s radio show archives.

 

Do you have any specific questions for Monica? Then get in touch with her through her website and blog Hey Monica B. She loves hearing your feedback!

 

As for me, I’m curious–what dosha are you?

I’m definitely a pitta and still figuring out if I have some vata or kapha in me…if you know me, what dosha do you think I am?

Let me know in the comments below please!

 

 

 

 

Photo and illustrations by Monica Bloom
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Yogis Talk Radio Show : Erinbell Fanore

Yoga DVD

Like many other entrepreneurs, we yoga teachers get together to share business and life stories. When I met Erinbell Fanore, a fellow yoga teacher in Berlin teaching hatha and yin yoga, at one of these casual get-togethers, I was most impressed that she made her own yoga DVD on the sunny island of Malta. She talked about it like it was easy to pull off, so I had to ask how how she did it with such ease as one of my Yogis of the Month.

Even if you don’t want to make your own yoga DVD, listening to how simple and easy it is to tackle a big project once you break down into steps and ask for help is helpful for any project. You would imagine that producing a DVD would take months to do, right? But knowing that Erinbell produced hers in just two weeks completely changed my mindset of what’s possible. And expanding possibilities is always a good thing.

 

 

Listen to my interview* above with Erinbell (or download it!) to find out about:

  • her introduction to yoga through…Cindy Crawford in the desert?!
  • retraining your muscles through two somatics exercises she shares
  • where to find out more about somatics (ok, here’s a link for you : Somatics: Reawakening The Mind’s Control Of Movement, Flexibility, And Health)
  • how she produced her DVD on Malta
  • how she makes yoga videos more than just instructional but also cinematic (see one below!)

 

 

If you want to produce your own yoga DVD in two weeks, here are your ACTION STEPS:

  1. Figure out your lesson plan and write it down into a script.
  2. Record the script with a live model.
  3. Find a wonderful location like Malta.
  4. Play the recording of the script and follow it.
  5. Edit the visuals to match the script voiceover.
  6. Put it on a DVD.
  7. Extras : get a cover designed.
  8. Now sell it at your classes, workshops, and online

Interested in finding out more about Erinbell? You can order her yoga DVD and watch her free street yoga videos on her website.

* My sound quality is improving now that I’ve bought the Zoom H2 to use as a microphone, but I’m still learning how to work with it.

 

 

 

 

Photo & Video above from Erinbell Fanore
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Yogis Talk Radio Show : Alessandro Aliosha Pedori at Wat Suan Mokkh

Hot Spring at International Dhamma Hermitage of Wat Suan Mokkh

 

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to meditate for ten days on a silent meditation retreat? I definitely have.

During my yoga teacher training in India, we were not supposed to speak during meals. The idea was that we were supposed to be fully conscious of our food rather than getting distracted by socializing. Some people took it further and did not speak for an entire day, wearing a little sign around their neck that they were observing silence aka mouna. Some people say observe silence so that you save your energy to turn inwards rather than focusing outwards in idle talking. Once you quiet speech, the mind quiets down too. Others say that there is no need for communication if you realize the great truth that there is no other–’they’ are no other than me. Whatever the reason, observing silence is a powerful practice especially in conjunction with meditation.

Alessandro Aliosha Pedori

I decided to connect with Alessandro Aliosha Pedori, teacher of contact improv and yoga in Berlin, who meditated in Thailand for ten days at the Buddhist International Dhamma Hermitage of Wat Suan Mokkh. Even though their website is quite comprehensive, even giving out a detailed 11-page description of their yoga classes, I wanted to know what it was really like to experience and live there for a silent meditation retreat.

 

Listen to my interview* above (or download it!) with Alessandro to find out:

  • The most painful part of sitting meditation
  • Why Wat Suan Mokkh is way better than Vipassana meditation centers
  • What he would have done differently at Wat Suan Mokkh knowing what he does now (hint : bring a pillow!)
  • Who would be your fellow meditators and the leaders / facilitators?
  • Was the food good?
  • The lasting effects of meditating for ten days in Thailand

 

If you want to meditate for 10 days at Wat Suan Mokkh, here are your ACTION STEPS:

  1. Pack a yoga mat, a pillow, tiger balm, and some paracetamol. No pretty clothes allowed, so leave them at home.
  2. Get yourself to Thailand by plane, train, automobile, boat, foot in outside the months of January and February.
  3. Make it to the Buddhist hermitage by 3pm on the last day of the month to register for the next ten days.
  4. Meditate, practice yoga, soak in the hot spring, and eat delicious Thai food for ten days.
  5. Celebrate with a Thai iced tea upon your ‘graduation’ from meditation.
  6. Stay at the main monastery in the woods for a few days.
  7. Escape to a tropical island in Thailand.

Interested in finding out more about Alessandro? His soon-to-be-launched website is aliosha.info.

* I apologize for the poor sound quality. My skype-to-skype interviews sound fine, but my skype-to-phone interviews get a lot of static and interference. My new microphone is in the mail; stay tuned to hear the difference with a Zoom microphone.

 

Have you attended a silent meditation retreat or ever wanted to?

Share your experiences–critical and cynical or blissed out–in the comments below please.

 

 

 

Photos (from top to bottom): Hot springs at Wat Suan Mokkh and Alessandro Aliosha Pedori
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Yogis Talk Radio Show: Ashley Brunner of Give A Mat

Yoga Students in Meditation at Suly in Bali

I was so excited to speak to Ashley Brunner shortly before the holidays. I met her through Give a Mat, a not-for-project that connects donors to high school students in Bali, Indonesia.

Ashley’s story illustrates how quickly projects can be implemented from getting an idea to serve and putting it to action in a just a few months. In April of 2011, she was inspired to start the Give a Mat program and got it registered and set up online by late August. So in four short months she founded a not-for-profit with an international reach! How amazing is that?

Yoga students at Suly in Bali

So, listen to the entire interview with Ashley to learn about the following and more…

  • How giving may be the best way to heal
  • Where to get help, especially with the tech side of things, if you are thinking of starting a not-for-profit–(hint: here’s a link to Grassroots)
  • Challenges of running a not-for-profit with international reach
  • Ashley’s best advice if you want to start a similar project

If you have any questions or comments, get in touch with Ashley at giveamat at gmail dot com, on Facebook, and at Give A Mat’s website. Give a Mat is looking for donors, other schools to help, and volunteer yoga teachers.

Images from Give A Mat
 
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Yogis Talk Radio Show: Inaugural Episode with Eliza Lynn Tobin


Welcome to the the very first episode of the Yogis Talk radio show! I am so excited to share this with you.

In this series I’ll be interviewing yoga teachers and practitioners whose yoga practice has impacted all areas of their lives.

Today I am pleased to introduce you to Eliza Lynn Tobin from Art Asana, who explores the connection between yoga and visual art through her radiant yoga-inspired paintings.

Eliza has been an artist for almost her entire life and offers a wealth of experience about how to become more creative through yoga, as well as sharing some of her best advice, including:

  • How to find the space of healing in the experience of flow (as explained by psychologist Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi)
  • The story behind her beautiful, inspiring manifesto–downloadable here: http://www.artasana.com/manifesto)
  • Creating from within rather than with your external senses
  • And why it’s important to find playful joy in your daily life

Listen to the entire interview to learn more…


If you have any questions or comments, get in touch with Eliza at her website Art Asana, on Twitter as @elizatobin, and on Facebook. If you want to work with Eliza when her next Dancing in the Fire session is accepting new students, check out her work here: http://www.30daysofyogaandart.com

 

Images by Eliza Lynn Tobin of Art Asana
 
 
 
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